2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10540/262465
Title:
Food and tourism: an effective partnership? A UK-based review
Authors:
Everett, Sally; Slocum, Susan L.
Affiliation:
Anglia Ruskin University; Utah State University, USA
Reference:
Everett, S. and Slocum, S.L., 2012. Food and tourism: an effective partnership? A UK-based review. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, iFirst, 1-21.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis/Routledge
Journal:
Journal of Sustainable Tourism
Issue Date:
Nov-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10540/262465
DOI:
10.1080/09669582.2012.741601
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09669582.2012.741601; http://www.tandfonline.com/action/showAxaArticles?journalCode=rsus20
Abstract:
This paper focuses on the role of food tourism in delivering sustainability agendas by examining how the agriculture and tourism sectors have struggled to realise measurable successes because of constraints, conflicting ambitions and low levels of social capital. It focuses on the United Kingdom, which has tasked regional development agencies to adopt food tourism as a means to grow local economies, create jobs and improve natural resources and diversify. In 2009/10, 16 interviews and six workshops were conducted with stakeholders to gauge industry challenges and needs in implementing food tourism. Based on qualitative findings, a model was developed which maps five emergent themes (knowledge exchange, the supply chain, fear of change, regionalisation and marketing) alongside five sustainability principles (strong and just society, good governance, sustainable economy, working within environmental limits and using sound science responsibly). The paper argues that if food tourism is to deliver its purported sustainable benefits, the policy environment must cultivate significant social capital through the cooperation of different industries with varying needs, motivations and challenges through joint marketing schemes, more localised distribution channels and enhanced policy engagement. Scotland and Wales are more successful than England, but overall food and tourism are not yet in effective partnership.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
food tourism; agriculture; social capital; policy; United Kingdom
ISSN:
0966-9582
EISSN:
1747-7646

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEverett, Sallyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSlocum, Susan L.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-13T10:14:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-13T10:14:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012-11-
dc.identifier.citationEverett, S. and Slocum, S.L., 2012. Food and tourism: an effective partnership? A UK-based review. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, iFirst, 1-21.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0966-9582-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09669582.2012.741601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10540/262465-
dc.description.abstractThis paper focuses on the role of food tourism in delivering sustainability agendas by examining how the agriculture and tourism sectors have struggled to realise measurable successes because of constraints, conflicting ambitions and low levels of social capital. It focuses on the United Kingdom, which has tasked regional development agencies to adopt food tourism as a means to grow local economies, create jobs and improve natural resources and diversify. In 2009/10, 16 interviews and six workshops were conducted with stakeholders to gauge industry challenges and needs in implementing food tourism. Based on qualitative findings, a model was developed which maps five emergent themes (knowledge exchange, the supply chain, fear of change, regionalisation and marketing) alongside five sustainability principles (strong and just society, good governance, sustainable economy, working within environmental limits and using sound science responsibly). The paper argues that if food tourism is to deliver its purported sustainable benefits, the policy environment must cultivate significant social capital through the cooperation of different industries with varying needs, motivations and challenges through joint marketing schemes, more localised distribution channels and enhanced policy engagement. Scotland and Wales are more successful than England, but overall food and tourism are not yet in effective partnership.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis/Routledgeen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09669582.2012.741601en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/action/showAxaArticles?journalCode=rsus20en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Sustainable Tourismen_GB
dc.subjectfood tourismen_GB
dc.subjectagricultureen_GB
dc.subjectsocial capitalen_GB
dc.subjectpolicyen_GB
dc.subjectUnited Kingdomen_GB
dc.titleFood and tourism: an effective partnership? A UK-based reviewen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1747-7646-
dc.contributor.departmentAnglia Ruskin Universityen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentUtah State University, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sustainable Tourismen_GB
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