2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10540/218072
Title:
Protecting children: the central role of knowledge
Authors:
Akister, Jane
Affiliation:
Anglia Ruskin University
Reference:
Akister, J., 2011. Protecting children: the central role of knowledge. Practice: Social Work in Action, 23(5), pp.311-323.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Practice: Social Work in Action
Issue Date:
Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10540/218072
DOI:
10.1080/09503153.2011.620090
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09503153.2011.620090
Abstract:
Following the deaths of Victoria Climbié and of Peter Connelly (Baby P) the media has raged about social work competence, the public have expressed dismay and the government has responded with proposals designed to alter practice procedures. Altering procedures gives the appearance of change without necessarily improving practice. Do social workers have sufficient knowledge to make the decisions that they are responsible for? This paper examines whether a restricted knowledge base contributes to social workers missing or misjudging signs of maltreatment. The paper also looks at evidence suggesting that social workers are resistant to developing new ways of working. A more positive approach to developing expert knowledge and engagement with the inter-professional knowledge base is proposed.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
protecting children; social work knowledge base; identifying child maltreatment
ISSN:
0950-3153
EISSN:
1742-4909

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAkister, Janeen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-10T14:34:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-10T14:34:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-
dc.identifier.citationAkister, J., 2011. Protecting children: the central role of knowledge. Practice: Social Work in Action, 23(5), pp.311-323.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0950-3153-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09503153.2011.620090-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10540/218072-
dc.description.abstractFollowing the deaths of Victoria Climbié and of Peter Connelly (Baby P) the media has raged about social work competence, the public have expressed dismay and the government has responded with proposals designed to alter practice procedures. Altering procedures gives the appearance of change without necessarily improving practice. Do social workers have sufficient knowledge to make the decisions that they are responsible for? This paper examines whether a restricted knowledge base contributes to social workers missing or misjudging signs of maltreatment. The paper also looks at evidence suggesting that social workers are resistant to developing new ways of working. A more positive approach to developing expert knowledge and engagement with the inter-professional knowledge base is proposed.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09503153.2011.620090en_GB
dc.subjectprotecting childrenen_GB
dc.subjectsocial work knowledge baseen_GB
dc.subjectidentifying child maltreatmenten_GB
dc.titleProtecting children: the central role of knowledgeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1742-4909-
dc.contributor.departmentAnglia Ruskin Universityen_GB
dc.identifier.journalPractice: Social Work in Actionen_GB
All Items in ARRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.